Category Archives: Archaeo-Pad

Everything the up to date archaeologist needs to record a dig.

Lockdown Upside?

There aren’t many upsides to lockdown, but it has mean that I’ve finally had time to focus on fixing the Android version of Archaeo-Pad. Multiple updates to Android meant that a number of ‘undocumented features’ in Android had been fixed, leaving Archaeo-Pad with some peculiar behaviour.

While its nowhere near as important as the UK’s Covid 19 tracking App, I sympathise with the developers – neither Google nor Apple give any quarter in their decisions to change their operaing systems and you often get little or no warning that an App is now deemed to ‘violate the guidelines’.

One of the most frustrating bugs to fix was that Android, or at least the vesion on my test tablet, insists on automatically opening zip files. That meant that I couldn’t offer Archaeo-Pad as an option for these files which in turn meant the import function didn’t work. Curiously Gmail doesn’t behave that way but to provide an option for non-Gmail users I’ve changed the App so it will also recognise files named “.zap”

Other resolved issues are;

Problems with text not being saved in forms
Google maps did not pinch zoom when identifying location of a find
Export to photos to HTML crashed
Links between contexts weren’t always created
Export of photo forms to CSV caused problems in Excel

Tested on Android version 9 and 5.1.1 (Both on Samsung tablets)

Also on Android 7 (Lenovo TB-7304F – cheap, but possibly the slowest tablet I’ve ever used!)

Forms for Skulls!

Archaeo-Pad is mainly aimed at recording data on site, but one of my Skelly-Pad contacts pointed out that it might also be a good tool to capture measurements from skeletons – particularly if you don’t want to do a complete skeleton inventory , which is what Skelly-Pad is aimed at.

After a bit of checking for the right measurements to collect I’ve put together a form to record the cranial measurements (that’s skull for nom-osteologists!) needed to do an ancestry assessment using the widely used CranID software created by Richard Wright.

I’ve also created a Forms Library to hold custom forms, so if you design a form you think other people might find useful and are willing to share just let me know and I’ll add it to the list.

 

 

 

Why build a ‘Cut and Fill’ App?

Archaeo-Pad grew out of my experiences developing Skelly-Pad, an App for recording skeletons, which itself came about because I needed a subject for my final year dissertation for  BSc in Archaeology at the University of Reading. Being an IT specialist by background I was convinced it would be possible to build digital tools that would genuinely help archaeologists, who, it has to be said, are not always hugely receptive to new technology!

Lots of people suggested that a simple ‘Cut and Fill’ recording App would be useful so that’s what started me off developing Archaeo-Pad. There’s really 4 key principles behind it;

  1. Archaeologists differ in their approach to recording, often for very good reasons, so the App needed to allow people to create their own forms
  2. It needed to add value over and above the standard Apps that already exists – so it concentrates on the archaeology features (like Level calculations) and I decided not to try and build a drawing App – there are plenty of those already
  3. Data should only have to be entered once. Paper forms often ask for the same data to be entered multiple times, so if things go wrong you can track down the right plan, section or whatever. Archaeo-Pad makes it easy to keep track of which context belongs to which plan, sample, level and so on
  4. A proper, functioning App needs to have backups, exports and print facilities – so Archaeo-Pad includes an annoying backup reminder and lets you export data in printable format (HTML) or to a CSV, so you can pass context lists or finds lists on for processing in the office.

I used the prototype myself on a dig last year, and came back with lots of improvements, but it worked very nicely as a personal ‘dig notebook’  and will work just as well to record a complete dig.

Next stop,  linking Archaeo-Pad up with repositories such as iadb, ARK, Archie and Interris.

Archaeo-Pad on Amazon

Not many people know that any Android App can also be published for use on Amazon Kindle Fire tablets without any modification. So happy to day that Archaeo-Pad is now on Amazon.

For an entry level, low cost tablet the Fire is pretty good – its a little slower than my iPad and Samsung tablets but the cheapest is £50 – so not a bad place to start and they’re also pretty robust.

Context recording on a phone

Ditch your folders and clipboard and capture all your dig records on a tablet. Use our pre-defined forms for cuts, deposits, plans, sections, finds, samples and so on – or create new forms to suit your needs.

App includes;

  • Comprehensive lists of values for eg colours, textures based on an amalgamation of UK practices
  • Calculation of levels and linking levels to relevant forms
  • Tracks links between contexts and plans/sections/finds
  • Organise your work into collections
  • Export/import utility for back up and to print or output to spreadsheets or other databases
  • Create or customise your own forms and lists of values

There’s plenty of help inside the App but see the FAQ for more and a  walk-through of the steps to make your own customised forms, complete with your logo.